Drinking: Mint & Honey Green Tea, SweetLeaf


C.S. Lewis is one of the best authors of the twentieth century.  His writing includes the famous Narnia series, fiction and non-fiction religious books, as well as science fiction.  Lewis was friends with another top twentieth century writer, J.R.R. Tolkien, and they inspired each other’s work.  I will admit that thus far, I have only read his fiction works, although Mere Christianity has been on my to-read list for years.


I’m not sure when I first read The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe and the rest of the Narnia books because they have long been a part of my mental library and personal mythology.  My family actually owns the Focus on the Family Radio Theater version of all the books on CDs, which I listen to frequently, particularly on road trips.  The allegorical stories of a magical land with talking animals, reached easily through wardrobes, train stations, or schoolyards captivated me the way they have captivated many children.  


From Narnia, I explored Lewis’ Space Trilogy, a nominally science fiction series that is once again allegorical.  Lewis and Tolkien disliked much of contemporary science fiction and resolved to write their own.  Lewis wrote Out of the Silent Planet, about an Earth expedition to Mars.  Frankly, these books are overwritten and more fantasy than scifi. Lewis made no effort whatsoever to include any science.  Their only claim to the genre is that they take place on other planets, which bear no relation to the actual planets in our solar system.  However, they are a fascinating look at Lewis’ ideas about humanity and original sin, so they are worth a read for those themes.  His thoughts on the various iterations of humans on the various planets are also interesting.  


My favorite Lewis book, however, is The Screwtape Letters.  It’s a “behind the scenes” look at sin and temptation written as a series of letters between a lower-level devil trying to “win” a soul for his side and a higher-level devil who is telling him the best strategies and tactics “the enemy” might use.  It’s absolutely fascinating and gives the reader much food for thought.

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe is the place to begin with Lewis’ work, no matter what age.  Whether you are a Christian or not, you will also enjoy his works for their ideas about life, God, and what it means to be human.

That’s why I love C.S. Lewis.

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